Copper - the World’s First Super Metal

Historical Use of Copper

 

Copper was first used by man over 10,000 years ago. A copper pendant discovered in what is now northern Iraq has been dated about 8700 B.C. For nearly five millennia copper was the only metal known to man, and thus had all the metal applications. Source: www.copper.org

 

copper bowls 

 

Copper’s natural characteristics make it malleable, a superior conductor of energy, and 100% recyclable.  Making it perfect for making art, jewelry, coins as well as household utensils, bowls, and cookware. 

 

Copper’s Role in the Kitchen

 

Copper has been used and cherished for around 9,000 years. Pots that are made of copper are ideal heat conductors; the material is durable, hygienic, and corrosion-resistant. Source: www.tngun.com

 

 copper pots and copper pans

 

For thousands of years, copper has been used to make the best pots and pans for cooking and roasting. This is due to copper possessing excellent material properties.

 

Specifically, it is the excellent heat conductivity that makes copper a perfect base material for pots and pans. It is widely known that copper conducts heat five times better than iron and even twenty times better than stainless steel. Due to the excellent heat conductivity properties, the heat spreads more evenly in copper cookware than in traditional pots and pans. This allows the temperature to be regulated more easily and therefore reduces the danger of scorching. As a result, it is possible to cook with less energy. As copper stores heat very well, meals that are served in copper pots stay warm longer than those prepared in traditional ones.

 

While copper has been mined, smelted, and used for thousands of years in art, currency, architecture, weapons and to cook our food, one can argue the most important use and its true superpower is the ability to kill germs.

 

Although not aware of what bacteria were or how bacteria cause illness, ancient civilizations did understand there were medicinal benefits in using copper.  It is well documented that the Ancient Egyptians used water poured from copper to sterilize chest wounds. Greeks, Romans, and Aztecs relied on copper compounds to treat burns, headaches, and ear infections. Source: www.washingtonpost.com

 

The Amazing Antibacterial Properties of Copper

 

It has been shown that copper and its alloys can eradicate the most resistant bacteria and viruses.

 

The antimicrobial activity of copper and copper alloys is now well established, and copper has recently been registered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the first solid antimicrobial material.” Source: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov 

 

Scientific tests in laboratories and experiments in different hospitals around the world have proved the effectiveness of copper and its alloys against bacteria such as salmonella, Escherichia coli, and staphylococcus resistant to methicillin (antibiotic). A copper surface eliminates staphylococcus in 90 minutes and reduces the number of pathogenic germs by 90 to 100% relative to the same surface constructed of standard materials.

 

 Influenza A

 

Another study conducted by the University of Southampton has shown that Copper could help prevent the spread of flu infections. Recent research shows that the Influenza A virus is virtually eradicated within six hours on copper surfaces. Source: www.sciencedaily.com 

 

 

So now you know the true secret behind every SoLuna Copper Sink…

 

 SoLuna Copper Farmhouse Sink

 

1) Superior Craftmanship of a SoLuna Copper Sink 

 

Each of our copper sinks is handmade to the highest standards by individual artisans, practicing the centuries-old craft of coppersmithing. Recycled materials are melted, purified, and refined into high-grade copper, before being hammered in an open copper forge into one-of-a-kind pieces of art. Our artisans are paid fair trade wages for each unique sink, ensuring not only environmental sustainability but social renewal and excellent artistry as well.

 

2) The SoLuna Copper Sink is the environmental choice

 

SoLuna stands out from the pack with the original handcrafted copper sinks made entirely out of recycled and repurposed copper. Crafted by master coppersmiths, the sinks from Copper Sinks Online bring you into the green building movement with style and elegance, making more than just a design statement. Our unique and stunning sinks support the efforts of skilled artisans and their craft, all while transforming wires, pipes, and discarded copper construction materials, which might otherwise go into a landfill, into a must-have addition to your home décor. This reclaimed copper is melted down, and purified into its original pure elemental state, before being masterfully hammered and shaped in an open forge into the superior pieces of functional art. For an eco-conscious and distinctive accent to your home’s style, Copper Sinks Online gives you the best in selection, value, and craftsmanship.

 

3) The SoLuna Sinks made with the Superpower of Copper

 

When considering the most beautiful, durable, and environmentally conscious choices you can make in designing your home’s style, copper is the leading choice. For over ten thousand years, mankind has been mining this incredible metal from deep within the Earth, and now we enjoy its luster and utility in home sinks made only from reclaimed, recycled, and repurposed copper. Used throughout history for everything from primitive tools, to ancient plumbing systems (still in good condition 5000 years later!) to the hulls of early American warships, this miraculous metal has become part of the fabric of our civilization. Copper is a metal of infinite usefulness and sustainability, since it can be melted, re-forged, and reshaped repeatedly, never needing to be thrown away or wasted like so many other materials. In this way, you are not only supporting the green building movement today but laying the foundation for its future.

 

Sources:

copper.org      

tngun.com  

washingtonpost.com   

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov   

sciencedaily.com    

verywellhealth.com    

copperalloystewardship.com    

en.wikipedia.org